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Welcome to the American Freethought podcast! American Freethought was produced from 2007 to 2016 and ran 265 episodes. We're currently featuring encore releases of all episodes, one a day, starting on January 1, 2017. If you like what you hear, please share with your friends. For more content (blog posts and not just podcast episodes) visit AmericanFreethought.com. Thanks!

Aug 19, 2017

Encore release August 19, 2017.

An ESPN profile of National Football League's Arian Foster (a running back with the Houston Texans) highlights the fact of his atheism in a sport (and a state) that's notoriously religious. Meanwhile, evangelical poster-boy Tim Tebow (well known for his history of pious displays on the field) has been given a fourth chance in the NFL, this time as a quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Plus:

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has refused a request by the state attorney general to reconsider their ruling that Ten Commandments monument installed on the state capitol grounds is unconstitutional. It's not clear when the monument will be removed, but conservative legislators are already plotting to set in motion an amendment that will revoke the state's separation of church and state. Meanwhile, the Satanic Temple will be looking for a new home for their recently unveiled statue of Baphomet (which they had planned to donate to Oklahoma as a counterbalance to the Ten Commandments).

There's been a sudden outbreak across the South and Midwest of sheriffs and police chiefs who want to spend taxpayer money to put IN GOD WE TRUST decals on their offical vehicles. Sure, it's officially the national motto, but inevitably the bureaucrats behind it can't help blathering on about the rights of the majority, America is a Christian nation, yadda yadda yadda.

Yet another secularist blogger (the fourth this year!) has been hacked to death in Bangladesh by Islamic extremists. Niloy Neel was murdered in his own apartment while his wife was held in another room. While the vast majority of Bangladeshis are understandably outraged, the police and courts seem slow to show progress in preventing the violence and bringing those responsible to justice.